Carmina Burana – O Fortuna

Posted: April 11, 2015 in media-culture
Tags: ,

It’s that one cool classical song they always play when something evil or scary or BADASS is going to happen! It sounds satanical, but it’s actually a religious song (pawn intended?)

Can’t actually recall when I have first heard it (most probably in an alien movie soundtrack 😛 ), but I was captivated! It was AWESOME. One of the most awesome music compositions I had heard till then and still one of the most powerful, energetic and full of strength pieces of music. The composer is a German guy, Carl Off, who took a collection of (24) medieval poems and made amazing music out of them – more precisely in 1937 – first audition was nearby, in Frankfurt Opera.

My favourite is O Fortuna, the piece which starts and ends the collection. “In this piece, the author talks about to Fortuna (the goddess of luck in the Roman mythology) – praising her greatness, as well as her malevolence”. The rest of the songs cover a wide range of topics, from the fickleness of fortune and wealth, the ephemeral nature of life, the joy of the return of Spring, and the pleasures and perils of drinking, gluttony, gambling and lust.

Well, I have recently heard it in Tonhalle, and I was not disappointed. It was as amazing, even more so, live than on YouTube!

Nearly 100 musicians, 100 brains in sync for more than 1 hour, an engineering masterpiece at the very least. Every time I hear such powerful pieces of music, there is tiny devil in my head chuckling mischievously: Beethoven would have loved this!

O Fortuna vs. Final Fantasy

Advertisements
Comments
  1. Theo says:

    Hearing it live some years ago somewhat ruined it for me, because you can never get the same thing out of the recordings afterwards. :-S

  2. cristinacrow says:

    Past weekend I’ve also seen Rigoletto in the Opera House. The thing is…even if live is better, when you compare some no-name live with a recorded Anna Netrebko/Elena Garanca combination…I still vote for Anna 😀

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s